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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

6 edition of Typological Change in Chinese Syntax (Oxford Linguistics) found in the catalog.

Typological Change in Chinese Syntax (Oxford Linguistics)

by Dan Xu

  • 307 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages272
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7405578M
ISBN 100199297568
ISBN 109780199297566

Typological change in Chinese Syntax, Oxford University Press. Tangwang hua yanjiu [Studies of the Tangwang language] Beijing: Minzu chubanshe. (To appear) Chuanshi wenxian yu chutu wenxian de lishi jufa yanjiu. [Studies on diachronic syntax based on transmitted and excavated texts] Beijing: Shangwu yinshuguan [Commercial Press] (To. 5 9 2. Verbal simplicity (continued) 2b. Chinese activity verbs are atelic: English write, read etc. are telic when taking a definite object; Chinese write, read are atelic: John wrote the letter in 30 minutes, read the book in *Zhangsan zai sanshi fenzhong nei, jiu xie-le neifeng xin, jiu kan-le na-ben shu. Zhangsan zai 30 fenzhong nei jiu xie-hao-le neifeng xin.

Del Gobbo () restates (3b, c) as (4a) and exemplifies it with Chinese (4b), in which the relative IP wo zuotian mai shu de ‘that I bought book yesterday’ is the complement of a zero determiner (in Del Gobbo's analysis, the relative marker de takes no syntactic position) and that the relative head shu ‘book’ is raised from inside the.   Mapping Chinese syntactic structures therefore offers a window into the origin of heavily "scrambled" constructions often observed in other languages. The book includes a preface that will discusses the goal of cartography and explains how the collection contributes towards our understanding of this approach to : Oxford University Press.

New Perspectives on Chinese Syntax by Waltraud Paul () is a theory-oriented discussion of Chinese syntax after Huang, Li, and Li (). Even though the book does not provide a full coverage of Chinese syntax as expected of descriptive or reference grammars, it explores in depth the. Typological models and diachronic change in Chinese Typological models and diachronic change in Chinese JEPSON, JILL This paper explores the diachronic predictions of the typological models of Greenberg, Vennemann, and Hawkins, by matching their universah against attested change in Chinese. The proposal made by some linguists is that Chinese has undergone a long-term.


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Typological Change in Chinese Syntax (Oxford Linguistics) by Dan Xu Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book demonstrates that Old Chinese was not the analytic language it has usually been assumed to be, and that it employed morphological and lexical devices as well as syntactic means. The book describes the typological changes that have taken place since the Han period and shows how Chinese evolved into a more analytic language, supporting.

Typological Change in Chinese Syntax (Oxford Linguistics) - Kindle edition by Dan Xu. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Typological Change in Chinese Syntax (Oxford Linguistics).Cited by: Get this from a library. Typological change in Chinese syntax.

[Dan Xu] -- Interpreting the early history of Chinese, this title argues that Old Chinese was typologically a 'mixed' language. It shows that, though its dominant word order was subject-verb-object, this.

: Typological Change in Chinese Syntax (Oxford Linguistics) (): Dan Xu: Books. Typological Change in Chinese Syntax Dan Xu.

Combines phonological, morphological, and syntactic approaches ; Uses recently excavated texts to throw new light on Old Chinese syntax ; Can be used as a text for courses in Classical Chinese and Chinese diachronic syntax Typological Change in Chinese Syntax book Makes an original contribution to word-order typology.

MIT/Harvard,Xu, Typological change in Chinese syntax. Oxford Press, Oxford/New York, ) conditioned on the “multi-syllabic constraint” (Sun, Two conditions and grammaticalization of.

Comptes rendus / CLAO 37() XU Dan (). Typological change in Chinese syntax. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Recent years have seen a Author: Chaofen Sun. Dan Xu is the author of Typological Change in Chinese Syntax ( avg rating, 1 rating, 0 reviews, published ), Space in Languages of China ( av /5(2).

Syntax and typological change in English. Drift and language typology This was to change radically in the course of the Middle and Early Modern English period because inflectional endings were lost on a broad front with a typological realignment as a consequence.

The book will interest scholars and graduate students of Chinese linguistics, philology, classical literature as well as general linguists interested in word-order typology and language universals. It may be also be used as a text for advanced courses in Classical Chinese and Chinese diachronic syntax.

Typological change in Chinese syntax [electronic resource] / Xu Dan. Main author: Xu, Dan. Corporate Author: Ebook Central Academic Complete., ProQuest (Firm) Format: eBook Online access: Connect to electronic book via Ebook Central. In terms of word order typology, Mandarin Chinese is undoubtedly a VO language.

Syntactically, however, Mandarin Chinese exhibits some word order patterns that are unattested in other VO languages as well as some syntactic constructions that are rather rare among other languages of the world.

From the perspective of language universality and specificity, this chapter explores several Author: Fuxiang Wu, Yancheng He. Abstract This paper reports on a corpus-based study aimed at reexamining the typological status and diachronic change of motion expressions in Chinese, drawing on parallel texts consisting of autonomous motion expressions in Old Chinese (OC) and its Modern Chinese (MoC) translation.

The results show that MoC significantly differs from OC both in the preference of lexicalization patterns Author: Wenlei Shi, Wanglong Yang, Henghua Su. In the book Typological Change in Chinese Syntax, I claim that Old Chinese (OC) was typologically a “mixed language”.

Old Chinese was not an analytic language as it has usually been treated; it employed phonological, morphological, and lexical devices as well as syntactic means.

Grammatical relations were expressed in OC by hidden devices such as alternation between voiced and unvoiced Cited by: 2.

This chapter shows that, typologically, Old Chinese (OC) was a mixed language, in terms of both language type and word order.

It shows that the verb-object (VO) order was preferred by Chinese language evolution while the object-verb (OV) order fell into disuse or only survives in expressions and proverbs. It demonstrates why a spatial orientation term and a place word which share the same.

The book describes the typological changes that have taken place since the Han period and shows how Chinese evolved into a more analytic language, supporting this exposition with abundant : Feng Shengli.

This paper reports on a corpus-based study aimed at reexamining the typological status and diachronic change of motion expressions in Chinese, drawing on parallel texts consisting of autonomous motion expressions in Old Chinese (OC) and its Modern Chinese (MoC) translation.

The results show that MoC significantly differs from OC both in the preference of lexicalization patterns (Talmyan. Typological Change in Chinese Syntax (Oxford Linguistics) by Xu, Dan.

Oxford University Press, First Edition. Hardcover. New/New. Dark blue cloth-bound hardback; in new condition: firm and square with bright gilt lettering. Complete with original dustjacket; neat and sharp, not showing any scuffs, tears or chips.

Contents crisp, tight and clean; no pen-marks. Review a Brill Book; Making Sense of Illustrated Handwritten Archives; FAQ; Search.

Close Search. Advanced Search Help XU Dan (). Typological change in Chinese syntax. Oxford: Oxford University Press. in Cahiers de Linguistique Typological change in Chinese syntax.

Oxford: Oxford University Press. in Cahiers de Author: Chaofen Sun. This new edition of Syntax: A functional-typological introduction is at many points radically revised. In the previous edition () the author deliberately chose to de-emphasize the more formal aspects of syntactic structure, in favor of a more comprehensive treatment of the semantic and pragmatic correlates of syntactic :.

This book sets out to demystify Chinese. It places controversial issues in the context of current syntactic theories and offers precise analyses based on a large array of representative data.

Although the focus is on Modern Mandarin, earlier stages of Chinese are occasionally referred to in order to highlight striking continuities in its history.Typological Studies in Language A companion series to the journal Studies in Language. Volumes in this series are functionally and typologically oriented, covering specific topics in language by collecting together data from a wide variety of languages and language typologies.The change of word classes in Chinese is generally realized by syntactic means instead of derivational morphemes.

In this case, many words with different functions in Chinese share the same form. This typological feature of Chinese gives rise to the formal similarity between many congruent and metaphorical realizations of elements in the by: